Aug 12

D-Link DAP-2690 Wireless N Simutaneous Dual-Band PoE Access Point Review

DAP-2690-X-m2
  1. Intro
  2. Features
  3. Setup
  4. Wireless configuration
  5. Throughput tests (Wireless/Wired)
  6. Closing Notes
Intro: The Dlink DAP2690 is a enterprise level wireless access point that is  somewhat affordable for small to medium businesses, has lots of features and can tolerate a lot of heavy usage that enterprises require.
Features: The DAP2690 features the following:
Dual band 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz operation with 2 x2 MIMO connectivity at up to300Mbps
2 wired Gigabit LAN ports
4 2×2 mimo  5dBi  dual band internal SMA antennas with 21dBm output power for great wireless coverage and can also be upgraded for even better range.
Full VLAN configuration
Full and extremely detailed traffic shaping (QoS) and firewall controls
Fixed and DHCP client address assignments
Intrusion Protection Services
SNMP
And lots more
Setup:
1) Default SSID is dlink however you DO NOT connect to that. You must plug in to a router that has the 192.168.0.x subnet. It will NOT work to configure the URL with 192.168.0.50 default URL that D-Link tells you to. Both have to be in this subnet to configure! I tried attatching to my Meraki Z1 router and it would NOT show up as a connected device. Also for another thing, the d-link access point configures itself to an open SSID BY DEFAULT so if you connect this to your network be prepared to have leechers on you right away. It obtains internet access status immediately, exposing you! Not very good D-Link!
Let’s take a look at the status page that tells us all our status.
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Wireless Configuration:
Here’s the WLAN config screens:
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The DAP2690 supports WPA/WPA2 and supports PSK and Enterprise authentication types that can be different for each SSID. Selecting “Enterprise” allows you to use D-Link Authentication, which allows you to define a username and password rather then a static key, allowing for more fine control over your wireless network. User based controls allow you to define limits PER USER so that if let’s say, they get fired, you just delete thier user account and not have to change the ENTIRE NETWORK’S encryption key.
Intrusion Protection:
The DAP2690 has wireless intrusion protection built in so you don’t have to worry about rogue APs, spoofs, etc. It will also protect against flood attacks, etc.
Here’s the config screens:
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The intrusion protection has been tested and when I enabled it my phone/other devices could not connect to ANY of my other SSIDs besides the ones that are on the DAP2690. It worked well. I disabled the IPS features and the phone was able to connect to the other non-DAP2690 SSIDs. This is so people can’t bring rogue access points and it works.
Clustering feature:
The DAP also has something called “AP array” where you can cluster a few APs together and manage them as one
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Throughput Tests: (Wireless)
I will be using LAN Speed test for the throughput tests and PRTG to generate the graphs. It also is a comprehensive enterprise level network monitoring software and it can record uptime, transfer rates, errors, etc.
Test environment: (Set 1)
Specs of Building: This is going through about 32 ft through 2 walls, a solid all-wood dresser, and a chimney. The room has plaster walls in some places.
Specs of server :(my machine in the same room as theDAP2690): Intel i5 3570K/16GB Corsair XMS3 DDR3 1600 RAM/Nvidia Geforce 650Ti/Samsung 840 120GB SSD/Windows Server 2012 Standard/Realtek GBE NIC
Specs of client: (remote machine in other room): AGNXAndrakon/AMD Phenom 9650/4GB Corsair XMS2 DDR2 RAM/Nvidia Geforce 650Ti/Samsung 840 120GB SSD/Windows Server 2012 Standard/Amped Wireless ACA1 USB WLAN connection:USB3 via a PCI-Express addon card.
5Ghz 802.11an mode: Channel 161 -76dBm
LAN speed test: 25 stream 6GB file: 12Mbytes/sec or 96Mbits/sec
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2.4 GHz 802.11n mode: Channel 6 -69dBm
LAN speed test: 25 stream 6GB file: 5Mbytes/sec or 40Mbits/sec
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Test environment: (Set 2)
Specs of Building Test Run 1: 16Ft away thru a wood door hallway right outside the office where the DAP2690 is located.
Specs of server (my machine in the same room as theDAP2690): Intel i5 3570K/16GB Corsair XMS3 DDR3 1600 RAM/Nvidia Geforce 650Ti/Samsung 840 120GB SSD/Windows Server 2012 Standard/Realtek GBE NIC
Specs of client: HP2000-412NR/AMD E300/8GB DDR3 RAM/300 GB HDD/AMD RADEON 6310/Windows 7 x64 Home Premium/RalinkRT5390 WLAN
2.4 GHz 802.11n mode: Channel 11 -56dBm
LAN speed test: 25 stream 6GB file: 7Mbytes/sec or 56Mbits/sec
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Test environment: (Set 3)
Specs of server :(my machine in the same room as theDAP2690): Intel i5 3570K/16GB Corsair XMS3 DDR3 1600 RAM/Nvidia Geforce 650Ti/Samsung 840 120GB SSD/Windows Server 2012 Standard/Realtek GBE NIC
Specs of client (same room as the DAP2690): HP /Core 2 Duo/2GB DDR2 RAM/20GB HD/Intel GMA/Windows 7 x64 Home Premium/NETGEAR A6200 WiFi USB3.0 Adapter
5Ghz 802.11an mode: Channel 161 -72dBm
LAN speed test: 25 stream 6GB file: 11Mbytes/sec or 88Mbits/sec
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2.4 GHz 802.11n mode: Channel 6 -74dBm
LAN speed test: 25 stream 6GB file: 5Mbytes/sec or 40Mbits/sec
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Conclusion:
Pros:
Decent management software with lots of options
Decent coverage and throughput on 5Ghz
Cons:
No advanced client monitoring
Not so good 2.4Ghz throughput
No advanced logging/stats on website visits like Meraki does
Not very complete client info like Operating system, specs, etc. Very limited client details
Rating:  5/10
Recommended: mabye
From: http://remixedcat.blogspot.com/2014/08/dlink-dap2690-review.html

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Jun 28

Do not let its diminutive look fool you. Despite advisement but 130g, the D-Link DCS-2136L packs a robust punch with its video-image quality and sort of functions.

Set-up is fast and straightforward. It takes concerning 5 minutes, with clear directions provided each step of the approach. it’s support for Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS), simplifying the installation method even any. throughout the method, a free mydlink account are going to be created to allow you to remotely access your camera over the web.

The camera has two-way communication and motion detection settings, with push notification support in order that notifications may be sent to the mobile app or to your e-mail address. A microSD card slot supports American state cards of up to 32GB.

DCS-2136L review

The camera also supports the latest wireless standard, 802.11ac.

The mobile app has a smooth, clean layout and is updated regularly, occasionally with new features. It can save snapshots directly to the phone’s gallery, set motion detection on and toggle night-vision mode.

With the mobile app, you are limited to lower resolutions of 320 x 176 pixels and 640 x 360 pixels, but colours are still accurate. Even on 3G networks, the frame rate remains solid. The audio quality is clear, with little ambient noise to obscure conversation.

A two-way communication feature is present as well, but it mutes the camera’s microphone when you talk through the mobile phone. This is a double-edged sword. While you avoid the common screeching sound of audio feedback, it means that you are effectively deaf while talking.

A big drawback is the limited recording ability. You can save videos to the microSD card in the camera but you need to use the PC to start the recording.

DCS-2136L review_a

As with most IP cameras, accessing the camera via the PC provides deeper customisation with extra settings, such as motion sensitivity, wide dynamic range and, more importantly, the option for high-definition (HD) viewing at 1,280 x 720 resolution. When the HD viewing option is activated, the video image quality jumps up, growing sharper with more vivid colours.

For viewing at night, the camera comes with a high-powered white LED with an effective range of up to 15m, filling most rooms with light. Although powerful, this can be disconcerting at night.

Fortunately, the night vision is a great substitute. The camera boasts colour night vision, which works surprisingly well – it manages to retain and display colours well in a darkened room, accurately distinguishing green, red, blue and yellow cushions on a sofa.

Those looking for a well-designed camera with unique features such as colour night vision will enjoy this D-Link device. The constant updates to the mobile app also point to continued support for this camera in the future.

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Jun 25

D-Link Wireless N150 Cloud Router DIR-600L Overview

Create a high-speed wireless network for your home using the D-Link DIR-600L Cloud Router. Connect the device to a broadband modem and wirelessly share your high-speed Internet connection at up to 150Mbps. Enjoy surfing the web, checking e-mail, and chatting with family and friends online. The DIR-600L Cloud Router also includes 4 Fast Ethernet Ports that give you the flexibility to connect wired devices to the network.

D-Link Wireless N150 Cloud Router DIR-600L Overview

QRS Mobile

    • Setup your home network from your iOS and Android device
    • Avoid the hassles of conventional router setup
    • Simple interface
    • Step-by-step setup

mydlink Lite

 
    • Remotely monitor your network cameras from anywhere
    • Remote Pan & Tilt live video
    • Select video quality
    • No Monthly service fees
    • 2-way audio
    • Pinch-zoom

Standards

  • IEEE 802.11n – up to 150 Mbps1
  • IEEE 802.11g
  • IEEE 802.3
  • IEEE 802.3u

Wireless Frequency Range

  • 2.4 GHz to 2.4835 GHz

Antennas

  • 1 Fixed 5dbi External Antennas

Security

  • Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA/WPA2)
  • WPS™ (PBC/PIN)

Advanced Features

  • mydlink app for iOS and Android devices
  • Push Notifications:
    • Wireless Intrusion
    • Online User Notice
    • New firmware upgrade
  • User Control:
    • Access Control
    • Real-time Browsing Records
  • UPnP™ Support
  • Traffic Control

Advanced Firewall Features

  • Network Address Translation (NAT)
  • Stateful Packet Inspection (SPI)
  • MAC Address Filtering
  • URL Filtering

Device Management

  • Web UI

Diagnostic LEDs

  • Power
  • Internet
  • WLAN
  • LAN
  • WPS

Power Input

  • 5 V DC/1 A Through External Power Adapter

Operating Temperature

  • 32 to 104 ˚F (0 to 40 ˚C)

Operating Humidity

  • 0% to 90% non-condensing


Certifications

  • CE
  • Wi-Fi Protected System (WPS)
  • Wi-Fi Certified
  • FCC

Dimensions

  • 4.4” x 5.9” x 1.1” (112 x 152 x 28 mm)

Weight

  • 0.5 lb (246 grams)

Warranty

  • 1-Year Limited Warranty2


1 Maximum wireless signal rate derived from IEEE 802.11 specifications. Actual data throughput will vary. Network conditions and environmental factors, including volume of network traffic, building materials and construction, and network overhead, lower actual data throughput rate. Environmental factors will adversely affect wireless signal range. Wireless range and speed rates are D-Link RELATIVE performance measurements based on the wireless range and speed rates of a standard Wireless G product from D-Link. Maximum throughput based on D-Link 802.11n devices.

2 1-Year Limited Warranty available only in the U.S.A and Canada.

All references to speed are for comparison purposes only. Product specifications, size and shape are subject to change without notice, and actual product appearance may differ from that depicted herein.

D-Link Wireless N150 Cloud Router DIR-600L Reviews

1.I am a Comcast performance Internet user. We used to rent a modem from Comcast and use an old linksys 802.11.b wireless router. The Internet speed is extremely slow, both upload and download speed <1M. Sometimes it’s even stuck wile the signal strength looks fine. I bought a Motorola cable modem 3.0 and this dlink wireless router. The cable modem arrived earlier than dlink cloud router. I replaced it with the old Comcast cable modem. Our Internet speed improved. The download and upload speed both are around 3M for iPad 2, but the speed is still very slow for iPad 3 and old notebook (about 1M).I don’t know the reason. After the dlink cloud router arrived, our Internet totally changed. The download speed reaches 20M, upload speed above 3M. The set up is very easy. I just unplug all the devices( cable modem and other devices connected to the router), replace the router, plug all the devices from lower grade device to higher grade device one by one and wait for several minutes. Then I try to connect dlink wireless using iPad. Instructions appear and step by step I complete password set up etc. You can also change wireless name and password by connect to 192.168.0.1. The initial user name is admin and password is blank. Log in and change your set up. The only problem is that you can not use linksys as your wireless name. I tried that and problems occurred. I reset the modem and the router works ok again. The Internet speed test is completed by an iPad application speedtesthd.

The rang of the router is also good. We live in 2300 sq feet two stories house. The modem and dlink router are in the corner of first floor. Signals are strong enough in anywhere of second floor. In some place of the basement the iPad can also catch signals.
I only have these new devices for less than 10 days.

2.I really like this router. I had a problem setting this up, I called them and they were very patient and walked me through it. It had something to do with IP address, had comflicting problems. I have had no problems with it since. It will carry all through our house, I have 4 computers and a kindle and a tablet hooked to it and can use all at the same time. Another great product from D-Link.

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Nov 15

D-Link DAP-1320 Wi-Fi Range Extender Introduction

The Wireless Range Extender (DAP-1320) enables you to extend your existing wireless network coverage by placing the Wireless Range Extender in between your router and the wireless client devices. This is great for extending wireless coverage to basements, home offices or bedrooms that might be distant from your wireless router. The DAP-1320 increases the range of your wireless network by extending the wireless coverage of an existing wireless network.

dlink-12q4-DAP-1320-main

dlink-12q4-DAP-1320-main-lg

D-Link DAP-1320 Wi-Fi Range Extender Introduction

Note: Place the D-Link DAP-1320 within equal distance of your existing network/router and wireless clients.

D-Link DAP-1320 Features

• Faster Wireless Networking – The DAP-1320 provides up to 300Mbps* wireless connection with other 802.11n wireless clients. This capability allows users to participate in real-time activities online, such as video streaming, online gaming, and real-time audio.

• Extend Internet access for wireless devices – Allows you to extend your internet access throughout your home with devices such as laptops, Smartphones, tablets and more.

• IEEE 802.11n and 802.11g Compliant – The DAP-1320 is still fully compatible with the IEEE 802.11g standards, so it can connect with existing 802.11g USB and Cardbus adapters.

Design

The D-Link DAP-1320 looks like a power adapter—it’s only 2.11 by 1.65 by 1.89 inches (HWD) with two prongs, and it plugs directly into an electrical outlet. This simple yet powerful piece of wireless technology has just a single WPS button on its side and one LED to show you connection status.

The extender is single-band only, so it won’t extend 5GHz Wi-Fi, which is perfectly okay, because it’s the 2.4GHz band that can travel longer distance.

Included in the package are a quick install guide and a card that has the extender’s default SSID and password as well as the URL to the web-based GUI printed on it.

D-Link DAP-1320 Wi-Fi Range Extender User Reviews

PROS
Excellent signal coverage. Easy setup. Small size for easy placement.

CONS
May require setup near router. Wi-Fi network changes may require a reset.

BOTTOM LINE
D-Link has a new wireless range extender that not only is one of the smallest you’ll find on the market, but is incredibly easy to set up and provides terrific coverage.

The D-Link DAP-1320 is one of the best wireless networking devices I’ve tested from D-Link, and among all of the extenders I’ve tested, it provided the best coverage. I was also impressed with how well it worked with another vendor’s equipment. I’m confident that this little device, which did an impressive job of extending my test Wi-Fi network deployed in a high-rise office building with hundreds of access points all around, will work extremely well for the average home user. D-Link Wireless Range Extender gets a 4.5 out of 5 star rating, and is PCMag’s Editors’ Choice for wireless range extenders.

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Nov 13

The good: The D-Link DGL-5500 Gaming Router AC1300’s StreamBoost feature that intelligently prioritizes Internet bandwidth for gaming and real-time online applications.

The bad: The router lacks support for DynDNS and has a confusing interface. Performance is disappointing, especially compared with that of similarly priced routers.

The bottom line: The DGL-5500 has a lot of potential, but for now isn’t worth its high price.

Familiar physical design, totally new hardware

The D-Link DGL-5500 Gaming Router comes in the now-familiar vertical cylindrical design, first available in the DIR-645. It’s almost exactly the same in appearance as the DIR-868L — just shorter and slightly narrower — looking somewhat like the new Mac Pro, or more like a computer speaker than a router.

D-LinkDGL-5500_user-reviews1

Unlike the DIR-868L, however, the DGL-5500 can’t be wall-mounted. This is not a big deal, however, since most of the time a router is hidden in a corner or under the desk.

What is a big deal is that on the inside, the DGL-5500 is totally new. It’s the third 802.11ac (or AC for short) router from D-Link (the other two being the DIR-868L and DIR-865L) but unlike the previous two, it uses an 802.11ac chip from Qualcomm. This chip includes a feature called StreamBoost that intelligently monitors Internet traffic in real time and prioritizes the traffic based on type of application. The new router also supports only the second tier (dual-stream) setup of the 802.11ac standard, with a cap speed of just 867Mbps. Other AC routers can offer up to 1.3Gbps Wi-Fi speed.

Like all AC-enabled routers, the DGL-5500 is also a true dual-band 802.11n (N for short) router that offers up to 450Mbps of each of the two 5GHz frequency bands. In short, it supports all existing Wi-Fi clients on the market, regardless of their Wi-Fi standard revisions.

On the front the router has two round green LEDs that show thepower and Internet status. There are no other status lights for the network ports, which some users might miss. On the back, it has four gigabit LAN ports (for Ethernet-ready clients), one gigabit WAN port (to connect to an Internet source, such as a broadband modem), and a USB 3.0 port to host a USB device, such as a printer or an external hard drive. Also on the back are a power on/off button and a WPS button, which initiates a 2-minute window during which other WPS-enabled devices can enter the router’s Wi-Fi network.

D-LinkDGL-5500_user-reviews2

Setting up the DGL-5500 is typical of setting up a home router, as in this How To post. Basically, you plug the router into an outlet and connect its WAN port to an Internet source with an network cable (one is included with the router). Use another cable to connect a computer to one of the router’s LAN ports. If you don’t have a second cable, you can also use a Wi-Fi client (such as a computer or a tablet) and connect to the router’s default Wi-Fi networks. The router comes with a label with this information printed on it.

Now, from the connected computer you launch a browser and you will be greeted with a Web-based setup wizard that walks you through the process in a few simple steps. You can always go back to the router’s Web interface by pointing a browser from a connected computer to its default IP address, which is 192.168.0.1. The default log-in password is blank (keep the field clear).

New, sleek, but impractical Web interface

The D-Link DGL-5500’s Web interface is updated from the traditional well-organized and granular interface of most D-Link routers. The interface is now much sleeker with smooth animation during transitions. Main items are organized in a menu to the left and sub-items are organized in different tabs on top. The main part in the middle of the interface displays the settings of the current sub-item for you to customize. It’s generally self-explanatory.

D-LinkDGL-5500_user-reviews3

As I used the router, however, I found that the interface could use a lot of improvement: major configuration items are scattered in a disjointed way and some common settings are missing.

Take StreamBoost, the selling feature of the router, for example. This feature senses Internet traffic and automatically prioritizes the bandwidth, in real time, to make sure lag-sensitive applications such as online gaming and video chatting get priority while other, less important activities, such as file downloading, take a back seat. While this feature functioned well for the most part in my trials, the way it’s organized in the interface is terrible at best.

First of all, to turn StreamBoost on or off, you’ll need to go to Setup in the main menu and then the StreamBoost tab. (Here you can also opt in to StreamBoost’s Automatic Update, which regularly updates information on what application needs what type of priority. Joining this is generally a good thing, however, it does mean the router will send Qualcomm information about your network.) Once on, StreamBoost prioritizes the Internet by applications as well as by clients, which you can manually adjust in an entirely different part of the interface, the Priority tab in the My Network section. This separation makes StreamBoost and the priority list seem unrelated. It would be better if StreamBoost and all of its related settings were in one place.

Secondly, the priority list itself is very badly designed. Once StreamBoost is turned on, the interface arbitrarily puts all connected clients in a numeric order with No. 1 as the top priority. If you have multiple computers in a network, rearranging this list to match your desired priorities is usually a must, but unfortunately not easily. This is because you can move only one client at a time and only one step at a time. For example, if you want to move a computer from 3 to 1 you have to first move it to number 2, and then from 2 to 1. In other words, if you have 10 computers in your network and need to move the one at the bottom to the top, you will have to move it 10 times. It would be much less frustrating, especially in a large network, if you could just drag and drop the clients at will.

D-LinkDGL-5500_user-reviews4

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