Nov 29

Step 1: On your Android device, select the Settings icon.


Step 2: Under Settings, choose Wireless & networks.


Step 3: Select Wi-Fi settings.


Step 4: If Wi-Fi is not already turned on, tap the checkmark next to Wi-Fi to turn it on. When Wi-Fi is enabled, available SSID’s will appear below. Encrypted networks will be indicated with a padlock icon. Select the network to which youd like to connect.

Step 5: If password protected, type in your password and select Connect.


You should now be connected to your network.


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Jun 21

When we initially heard about Intel’s Wireless Display (WiDi for short) technology, we immediately suspected it would become the next killer application for notebooks. The dream of wireless streaming for video, particularly in consumer machines at consumer-level prices, was a big one. To date, WiDi hasn’t really grabbed a huge chunk of mind share, at least not in the way of some other things — things like Android and iOS. That said, it’s still a viable option, and it’s only getting better with time.


D-Link is now looking to cash in on the solution by shipping their MainStage for Wireless Display (DHD-131), which delivers the web directly to TV screens. It claims to be an easy way to surf the Web, view photos and stream online video, all from their HDTV; all you have to do is plug MainStage into the TV using an HDMI or A/V cable and with a push of a button it automatically connects to your router, allowing you to surf the web and view home movies from a network computer or laptop.


It relies on WiDi’s 2.0 implementation, allowing customers to enjoy Blu-ray movies, DVD movies, and content from Internet services like Intel Insider on your HDTV with up to 1080p HD clarity and 5.1 surround sound, and also share pictures, music, or videos. It’s available for $129.99 right now in the U.S., and will be available in Canada in July for $129.99. Not exactly cheap, but hey, cutting the cord never has been.

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Jan 26

The D-Link DCS-930L camera debuted at the end of 2010 and is an entry into a new market for D-Link, which has its North American offices in Fountain Valley, CA. The camera can connect to your network wirelessly or using a standard ethernet cord and the picture can be viewed on an iPhone or Android app.


These are the contents of the DCS-930L Box. The device retails for around $80.

The box says installation is easy, but it might not be easy for everyone. Installation seems to require a Windows PC, which means if you’re a Mac owner setup will require borrowing someone else’s computer. And though setting up the camera to use a wired connection was easy, it wasn’t easy to do the same thing for wireless during initial testing.


This is D-Link’s DCS-930L in the standard vertical position.


The DCS-930L can be swiveled into the horizontal position, but the Web-based controls and the iPhone app don’t seem to allow you to rotate the picture if you rotate the camera.


When up and running, the D-Link DCS-930L camera is effective. A tap on your iPhone and you can bring up the live picture of any of the cameras connected to your account. Check back at OC Unwired for a full review in the coming week, but if you have questions or just want to be alerted when a full review is done.

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