Nov 02

Step 1: Find and select the Settings icon on your iPhone, iPod Touch or iPAD.

A10576_image1

Step 2: Select Wi-Fi from the Settings menu.

A10576_image2

Step 3: If your Wi-Fi setting is currently Off, tap it to turn it on

A10576_image3

Step 4: Once your Wi-Fi is enabled you should see available networks appear below. Secure/Encrypted networks will have a padlock to the right of the name while open networks will not. Tap your network to join.

A10576_image4

Step 5: If you choose a network that requires a password, you’ll be prompted to enter it. Type in your password and select Join.

A10576_image5

When connected, your network SSID will be indicated in blue with a check mark beside it.

A10576_image6

Tags: , ,

Dec 02

This feature behaves as a router in areas where you cannot take your home router so that you may wirelessly connect to the internet.

1.Scan the QRS Mobile code to download “QRS Mobile” App from the App Store to your iPhone or iPad. You can also search “QRS Mobile” from the App Store.

D-Link DIR-505-Router Mode-Setup

2.Move the switch on the D-Link DIR-505 to “Router/AP Mode” and plug it into a wall outlet. From your iOS mobile device,click Settings. Then, click Wi-Fi.

D-Link DIR-505-Router Mode-Setup-2

3.Wireless Utility to displays the available wireless networks and select the Wi-Fi name that is shown on your companion card (ex: dlink-a8fa). Then, enter the Wi-Fi password included in your card (ex:akbdj19368).

D-Link DIR-505-Router Mode-Setup-3

4.Once it connected, click on the QRS Mobile icon from your iOS mobile device. Then click Start to continue.

D-Link DIR-505-Router Mode-Setup-4

5.Please follow the on-screen instructions to complete the setup.

D-Link DIR-505-Router Mode-Setup-5

6.Once the screen appears, you have successfully completed the setup. Please click Save and write down the Wi-Fi Name (SSID) and password on your companion card for future reference.

D-Link DIR-505-Router Mode-Setup-6

7.From your iOS mobile device go to your wireless utility to display the available wireless networks and select the network that you created for internet access.

D-Link DIR-505-Router Mode-Setup-7

Tags: , , , , ,

Nov 24

Sometimes it’s the little things that have the biggest impact. It may not scream “hot-ticket item”, but after using D-Link’s Wireless Range Extender ( D-Link DAP-1320), it’s clear how this device could greatly improve a home’s wireless network.

As you might have guessed, it extends the range of your current wireless network to places that may be far away from the router. In my house, the router is in a bedroom at one end and there are multiple devices (my PS3, Xbox, iPad, Android phone, etc.) that suffer in the living room from poor connection. It’s physics–you put a wall in front of a signal, it diminishes.

d-link-range-extender-2

I used to think the only way to fix that was to get a stronger router. A big box with multiple antennae sticking out of it. But when I think of those routers, I think of the tooling around required to configure it and the agony of changing info on multiple internet-connected devices to recognize it.

So seeing this tiny, inconspicuous device caught me by surprise. No ports, no antennae–just something that looked like the business end of a charger. It weighs about 72 grams, and has three noticeable features. On the back, two prongs that plug into any wall socket. On the front, an LED that lets you know when it’s connected. Finally, on the left side, there’s a synchronization button.

d-link-range-extender-1

Its simplicity in design is reflected in its operation. It wants the setup to be easy – hence giving you simple diagrams. If your existing router supports a Wi-Fi protected setup, the Range Extender connects with a push of a button. My router didn’t support WPS, so I had to manually connect. That may sound like the exact technical pain-in-the-ass that I wanted to avoid with a more complex router – but the only effort I had expended to this point was plugging it into the wall. No cables, no desk space or wall mounting.

d-link-range-extender-3

I could even use my iPad’s browser to configure the network. As I mentioned, the instructions were very clear. I connected to the network the Range Extender creates and logged into a site. The site let me change the name of that network and its password to my existing network name and password.

Now I had, effectively, two wireless networks in my house in under 10 minutes. Since both had the same name and password, my devices connected to whichever signal was stronger. My PS3, for example, used to connect with a signal strength of 60%. With the Extender, the new signal strength was 100%. The PlayStation is a bad example as PSN is notorious for its constant dropouts/connectivity issues and annoying system updates. While the latter problem was solved (updates took a few minutes, rather than half an hour), the connectivity issues were still present. Something I don’t blame the Range Extender for because my iPad, Xbox and Galaxy Nexus had no issues.

d-link-range-extender-4

Using Speedtest.net’s application before installation, I noticed that my phone pulled down 1.9 Mbps in the living room. After installation, it jumped to 18 Mbps. Numbers aside, Netflix loaded faster and in better resolution, YouTube started instantaneously and FaceTime never dropped a call.

Perhaps that’s what I love most about this little tool. It just worked. It helped solve an annoyance without changing the way I used my technology. If you live in a small apartment or close quarters, you’re not going to get this device. But if you are constantly struggling for consistent signal strength between floors, D-Link’s Wireless Range Extender would be a tiny blessing.

It sells for $49.99 at retailers like Best Buy, Futureshop and London Drugs.

Tags: , , , ,

Sep 15

D-Link, the cost-effective, standards-based unified networking solutions provider for small- and medium-sized businesses, introduced today at ASIS International 2012 the new D-Link® DCS-7010L high-definition outdoor mini bullet camera with integrated cloud services support and the D-Link® DCS-7513 two-megapixel outdoor bullet camera featuring a Sony® Exmor wide dynamic range sensor. In addition, the D-Link DCS-6010L 360-degree IP camera and D-Link DCS-7413 two-megapixel outdoor bullet camera will be amongst the IP surveillance solutions on display at ASIS, showcasing D-Link’s vast range of indoor and outdoor IP surveillance solutions with networking and cloud services capabilities for small businesses.

“D-Link is committed to providing innovative, easily-managed surveillance solutions with streamlined integration to protect businesses 24/7, and the ASIS International conference is an ideal venue to demonstrate the latest cameras solutions,” said Vance Kozik, director of marketing, IP Surveillance for D-Link. “Beyond its latest surveillance products, D-Link offers customers a complete end-to-end solution for small and medium-sized business deployments to manage a range of security, storage and switching needs.”

With integrated cloud-service support, the DCS-7010L allows users to view video feed from anywhere with remote cloud access and mobile apps for both Apple® and Android devices, including the iPhone®, iPad® and Android tablets. Boasting 1280 x 800 resolution, the DCS-7010L offers day/night support with integrated IR LEDs, a microSD card slot, two-way audio, and PoE support. The DCS-7010L is IP66-rated and ONVIF™ compliant, and comes in an easy-to-mount package.

The DCS-7513 two-megapixel outdoor bullet camera features a Sony Exmor wide dynamic range sensor and a cable management bracket to ensure the cabling is protected from outdoor elements and secure from vandalism. A convenient motorized lens allows integrators or end users to remotely adjust the zoom level or focus through the camera’s web interface. Additionally, the DCS-7513 features P-Iris, a new lens technology that allows precise control over the iris position to optimize light sensitivity and lens depth of field.

The additional IP Surveillance cameras featured at ASIS round out D-Link’s high-quality solutions for a range of small business needs:

D-Link DCS-6010L:

As the first fisheye fixed dome network camera from D-Link, the DCS-6010L 360-degree network camera delivers a 180-degree panoramic view via wall mount or 360-degree surround view via ceiling mount without blind spots. The camera is equipped with original surround, panoramic views and regional views for various mounting applications. Cutting-edge image processing technology allows video captured via the fisheye lens to be converted to conventional rectilinear projection for user-friendly viewing and analysis, while its two-megapixel progressive scan CMOS sensor allows video streams to cover a larger scene with higher-resolution images than an analog CCTV camera.

D-Link DCS-7413:

The D-Link DCS-7413 bullet camera features a two-megapixel progressive scan CMOS sensor, offering low noise and high sensitivity for professional surveillance and security applications. Using an ARM SoC, the camera provides excellent real-time video quality and can handle multiple video streams with different configurations activated simultaneously to address varying requirements for live viewing and recording. The full-featured DCS-7413 also includes full HD resolution, built-in IR LEDs for increased visibility at night, Power over Ethernet (PoE) for flexible installation options, and input and output ports for connectivity to external devices such as PIR sensors, switches and alarm relays.

Tags: , , , , , ,

css.php